Improving your services, the DevOps way

devops-italiaOn March 10th I was in Bologna for Incontro DevOps Italia 2017, the Italian DevOps meeting organized by the great people at BioDec. The three tracks featured several talks in both Italian and English, and first-class international speakers. And, being a conference in Bologna, it also featured first-class local food that no other conference around the world will ever be able to match.

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No leap second simulations this year

TurnBackTimeAs some of my readers already know, I changed jobs in Novembre: I left Opera Software to join Telenor Digital. We have decided not to run any leap second simulation here, so I am not going to publish anything on the subject this year. You can still refer to the post The leap second aftermath for some suggestions I wrote after the latest leap second we had in June/July 2015.

Good luck!

cf-deploy v2 released

Errata corrige: it’s actually v3! This is what happens when you don’t publish updates for your software for too long…


github-logo I took some time this weekend to release an update for cf-deploy. You have now the option to override the configuration hardcoded in the script by means of environment variables. Check the README for the details.

If you don’t know what cf-deploy is, that’s fair 😉 In two words, it’s a Makefile and a Perl front-end to it that makes it easier to pack together a set of files for a configuration management tools and send them to a distribution server. Designed with git and CFEngine in mind, it’s general enough that you can easily adapt it to any version control system and any configuration management tool by simply modifying the Makefile. If it sounds interesting, you are welcome to read Git repository and deployment procedures for CFEngine policies on this same blog. Enjoy!

 

cfengine-tap now on GitHub

github-logo Back from the holiday season, I have finally found the time to publish a small library on GitHub. It’s called cfengine-tap and can help you writing TAP-compatible tests for your CFEngine policies.

TAP is the test anything protocol. It is a simple text format that test scripts can use to print out the results and test suites can consume. Originally born in the Perl world, it is now supported in many other languages.

Using this library it’s easier to write test suites for your CFEngine policies. Since it’s publicly available on GitHub and published under a GPL license, you are free to use it and welcome to contribute and make it better (please do).

Enjoy!

An init system in a Docker container

DockerHere’s another quick post about docker, sorry again if it will come out a bit raw.

In my previous post I talked about my first experiments with docker. There was a number of unanswered questions at first, which got an answer through updates to the blog post during the following days. All but one. When talking about a containerized process that needs to log through syslog to an external server, the post concluded:

if the dockerized process itself needs to communicate with a syslog service “on board”, this may not be enough…

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A dockerized policy hub

DockerThis is a quick post, apologies in advance if it will come out a bit raw.

I’ve been reading about docker for a while and even attended the day of docker in Oslo. I decided it was about time to try something myself to get a better understanding of the technology and if it could be something useful for my use cases.

As always, I despise the “hello world” style examples so I leaned immediately towards something closer to a real case: how hard would it be to make CFEngine’s policy hub a docker service? After all it’s just one process (cf-serverd) with all its data (the files in /var/cfengine/masterfiles) which looks like a perfect fit, at least for a realistic test. I went through the relevant parts of the documentation (see “References” below) and I’d say that it pretty much worked and, where it didn’t, I got an understanding of why and how that should be fixed.

Oh, by the way, a run of docker search cfengine will tell you that I’m not the only one to have played with this 😉

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The future of configuration management – mini talks

On March 7th I was at the DevOps Norway meetup where both Jan Ivar Beddari and me presented an extended version of the ignite talks we held at Config Management Camp in February. The talks were streamed and recorded through Hangouts and the recording is available on YouTube.

The meeting gave me the opportunity to explain in a bit more detail my viewpoint about why we need a completely new design for our configuration management tools. I had tried already in a blog post that caused some amount of controversy and it was good to get a second chance.

I’d recommend you watch both Jan Ivar’s talk and mine, but if you’re interested only in my part then you can check out here:

And don’t forget to check out the slides, both Jan Ivar’s and mine.

Managing system services with CFEngine

An important system service is not running...

I have experienced that when people talk about a system’s configuration, they mostly think of software to be installed and configuration files to be deployed. That’s true, they are part of a system configuration, but there’s more to it — if Configuration Management was only that, you could rightfully call it “provisioning” instead. For example, another part of a system’s configuration is that certain critical services must be running and/or certain other services must not be running. And in fact, any configuration management tool has provisions to manage system services and ensure they are in the desired state (while they may differ a lot on the “when” and “how” and “how often” the state is checked).

CFEngine is no exception. You can take advantage of ready-to-use frameworks like NCF or EFL, or  roll your own checks. What I’m presenting you today is a simple bundle that I wrote called watch_service, that you can use to ensure that certain system services are up or down.

My approach is similar to NCF’s bundle called service_action in that it tries to provide a generic, system-agnostic bundle to manage services but with a few differences:

  • while service_action relies on information in NCF itself to make the bundle simpler to use, my watch_service relies only on CFEngine’s standard_services knowledge as available in the standard library;
  • while service_action returns information to the agent in the form of namespace-scoped classes (e.g.: the service was in the desired state, or the service was not in the desired state and the problem has been fixed successfully), watch_service only reports about the events by means of another bundle called report, whose code will be also provided in the last part of this post.
  • service_action supports many different actions, watch_service only supports “up” (ensure the service is running) or “down” (ensure the service is not running).

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