More Solaris 11 games


More games to play with Solaris 11. This time it's resolv.conf, and MAC addresses. …resolv.conf is now managed via SMF, as the header says:

#
# Copyright (c) 2011, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
#

#
# _AUTOGENERATED_FROM_SMF_V1_
#
# WARNING: THIS FILE GENERATED FROM SMF DATA.
#   DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE.  EDITS WILL BE LOST.
# See resolv.conf(4) for details.

My search list, which I got via DHCP, was way too short for my needs, so I decided to improve it. Some reading into the man page, and then:

bronto@isaiah:~$ pfexec svccfg -s svc:/network/dns/client
svc:/network/dns/client> setprop config/search="a list of domains separated by spaces"
svc:/network/dns/client> 
bronto@isaiah:~$ pfexec svcadm refresh svc:/network/dns/client

A cat of resolv.conf and a test with the host command showed that the configuration was in place and working.

What about MAC addresses? Well, ifconfig doesn't show them any more by default, even with the "-a" option. How do you get to those? This way:

bronto@isaiah:~$ sudo ifconfig bge0 ether
bge0: flags=1004843<UP,BROADCAST,RUNNING,MULTICAST,DHCP,IPv4> mtu 1500 index 2
        ether 0:1a:a0:6a:9c:da 

Update: ifconfig actually shows the MAC address if you run ifconfig interface, but only if you are root. After a long day fighting to get my Solaris 11 workstation back in track yesterday, I missed the difference between running ifconfig as a normal user, and as root.

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