cf-deploy v2 released

Errata corrige: it’s actually v3! This is what happens when you don’t publish updates for your software for too long…


github-logo I took some time this weekend to release an update for cf-deploy. You have now the option to override the configuration hardcoded in the script by means of environment variables. Check the README for the details.

If you don’t know what cf-deploy is, that’s fair 😉 In two words, it’s a Makefile and a Perl front-end to it that makes it easier to pack together a set of files for a configuration management tools and send them to a distribution server. Designed with git and CFEngine in mind, it’s general enough that you can easily adapt it to any version control system and any configuration management tool by simply modifying the Makefile. If it sounds interesting, you are welcome to read Git repository and deployment procedures for CFEngine policies on this same blog. Enjoy!

 

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cfengine-tap now on GitHub

github-logo Back from the holiday season, I have finally found the time to publish a small library on GitHub. It’s called cfengine-tap and can help you writing TAP-compatible tests for your CFEngine policies.

TAP is the test anything protocol. It is a simple text format that test scripts can use to print out the results and test suites can consume. Originally born in the Perl world, it is now supported in many other languages.

Using this library it’s easier to write test suites for your CFEngine policies. Since it’s publicly available on GitHub and published under a GPL license, you are free to use it and welcome to contribute and make it better (please do).

Enjoy!

How I configure a docker host with CFEngine

DockerAfter some lengthy busy times I’ve been able to restart my work on Docker. Last time I played with some containers to create a Consul cluster using three containers running on the same docker host — something you will never want to do in production.

And the reason why I was playing with a Consul cluster on docker was that you need a key/value store to play with overlay networks in Docker, and Consul is one of the supported stores. Besides, Consul is another technology I wanted to play with since the first minute I’ve known it.

To run an overlay network you need more than one Docker host otherwise it’s pretty pointless. That suggested me that it was time to automate the installation of a Docker host, so that I could put together a test lab quickly and also maintain it. And, as always, CFEngine was my friend. The following policy will not work out of the box for you since it uses a number of libraries of mine, but I’m sure you’ll get the idea.

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An init system in a Docker container

DockerHere’s another quick post about docker, sorry again if it will come out a bit raw.

In my previous post I talked about my first experiments with docker. There was a number of unanswered questions at first, which got an answer through updates to the blog post during the following days. All but one. When talking about a containerized process that needs to log through syslog to an external server, the post concluded:

if the dockerized process itself needs to communicate with a syslog service “on board”, this may not be enough…

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A dockerized policy hub

DockerThis is a quick post, apologies in advance if it will come out a bit raw.

I’ve been reading about docker for a while and even attended the day of docker in Oslo. I decided it was about time to try something myself to get a better understanding of the technology and if it could be something useful for my use cases.

As always, I despise the “hello world” style examples so I leaned immediately towards something closer to a real case: how hard would it be to make CFEngine’s policy hub a docker service? After all it’s just one process (cf-serverd) with all its data (the files in /var/cfengine/masterfiles) which looks like a perfect fit, at least for a realistic test. I went through the relevant parts of the documentation (see “References” below) and I’d say that it pretty much worked and, where it didn’t, I got an understanding of why and how that should be fixed.

Oh, by the way, a run of docker search cfengine will tell you that I’m not the only one to have played with this 😉

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systemd unit files for CFEngine

systemd logoLearning more of systemd has been on my agenda since the release of Debian 8 “Jessie”. With the new year I decided that I had procrastinated enough, I made a plan and started to study according to the plan. Today it was time for action: to verify my understanding of the documentation I read up to now, I decided to put together unit files for CFEngine. It was an almost complete success and the result is now on GitHub for everyone to enjoy. I would appreciate if you’d give them a shot and report back.

Main goals achieved:

  1. I successfully created three service unit files, one for each of CFEngine’s daemons: cf-serverd, cf-execd and cf-monitord; the units are designed so that if any of the daemon is killed for any reason, systemd will bring it back immediately.
  2. I successfully created a target unit file that puts together the three service units. When the cfengine3 target is started, the three daemons are requested to start; when the cfengine3 target is stopped, the three daemons are stopped. The cfengine3 target completely replaces the init script functionality.

Goal not achieved: I’ve given a shot at socket activation, so that the activation of cf-serverd was delayed until a connection was initiated to port 5308/TCP. That didn’t work properly: systemd tried to start cf-serverd but it died immediately, and systemd tried and tried again until it was too much. I’ll have to investigate if cf-serverd needs to support socket activation explicitly or if I was doing something wrong. The socket unit is not part of the distribution on GitHub but its content are reported here below. In case you spot any problem please let me know.

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Managing system services with CFEngine

An important system service is not running...

I have experienced that when people talk about a system’s configuration, they mostly think of software to be installed and configuration files to be deployed. That’s true, they are part of a system configuration, but there’s more to it — if Configuration Management was only that, you could rightfully call it “provisioning” instead. For example, another part of a system’s configuration is that certain critical services must be running and/or certain other services must not be running. And in fact, any configuration management tool has provisions to manage system services and ensure they are in the desired state (while they may differ a lot on the “when” and “how” and “how often” the state is checked).

CFEngine is no exception. You can take advantage of ready-to-use frameworks like NCF or EFL, or  roll your own checks. What I’m presenting you today is a simple bundle that I wrote called watch_service, that you can use to ensure that certain system services are up or down.

My approach is similar to NCF’s bundle called service_action in that it tries to provide a generic, system-agnostic bundle to manage services but with a few differences:

  • while service_action relies on information in NCF itself to make the bundle simpler to use, my watch_service relies only on CFEngine’s standard_services knowledge as available in the standard library;
  • while service_action returns information to the agent in the form of namespace-scoped classes (e.g.: the service was in the desired state, or the service was not in the desired state and the problem has been fixed successfully), watch_service only reports about the events by means of another bundle called report, whose code will be also provided in the last part of this post.
  • service_action supports many different actions, watch_service only supports “up” (ensure the service is running) or “down” (ensure the service is not running).

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Rudimentary compliance report for CFEngine

In CFEngine community you don’t have a web GUI with compliance report. You can get them via EvolveThinking’s Delta Reporting, but if you can’t for any reason, you need to find another way.

A poor man’s compliance report at the bundle level can be extracted via the verbose output. This is how I’ve used it to ensure that a clean-up change in the policies didn’t alter the overall behavior:

cf-agent -Kv 2>&1 | perl -lne 'm{verbose: (/.+): Aggregate compliance .+ = (\d+\.\d%)} && print "$1 ($2)"'

These are the first ten lines of output on my workstation:

bronto@brabham:~$ sudo cf-agent -Kv 2>&1 | perl -lne 'm{verbose: (/.+): Aggregate compliance .+ = (\d+\.\d%)} && print "$1 ($2)"' | head -n 10
/default/banner (100.0%)
/default/inventory_control (100.0%)
/default/inventory_autorun/methods/'proc'/default/cfe_autorun_inventory_proc (100.0%)
/default/inventory_autorun/methods/'fstab'/default/cfe_autorun_inventory_fstab (100.0%)
/default/inventory_autorun/methods/'mtab'/default/cfe_autorun_inventory_mtab (100.0%)
/default/inventory_autorun/methods/'dmidecode'/default/cfe_autorun_inventory_dmidecode (100.0%)
/default/inventory_autorun (100.0%)
/default/inventory_linux (100.0%)
/default/inventory_lsb (100.0%)
/default/services_autorun (100.0%)

Not much, but better than nothing and a starting point anyway. There is much more information in the verbose log that you can extract with something slightly more elaborated than this one-liner. Happy data mining, enjoy!

hENC version 3 released

github-logo Today I am releasing the version 3 of hENC, the radically simple hierarchical External Node Classifier (ENC) for CFEngine (version 2 was released at the end of May and added support for data containers).

This version adds new features and bug fixes, namely:

  • implemented !COMMANDS: a ! primitive is added to specify commands; three commands exist currenty: !RESET_ACTIVE_CLASSES to make hENC forget about any class that was activated up to that point, !RESET_CANCELLED_CLASSES ditto for cancelled classes, and !RESET_ALL_CLASSES that makes hENC forget about any class that was activated or cancelled;
  • fixed enc.cf, so that it is possible to run the henc module more than once during the same agent run;
  • added a Changelog;
  • improved tests: tests have been added for the new features and the whole test suite has been improved to support the TAP protocol; for example, it’s now it’s possible to use the prove utility to verify if hENC works correctly on your system before trying the installation.

See the README and Changelog for more information.

The leap second aftermath

TurnBackTimeThe leap second is finally behind us, and for the first time it has been transformed in an event. That had the unfortunate consequence that many channels where useful information had flown in the previous events were now flooded with bullshit. But it’s over. A giant army of idiots has finally stopped asking “what will you do with your extra second?”, a smaller but still noticeable army of inaccurate writers and journalists won’t write for a while that the atomic clocks need to be stopped for a second to realign with the Earth (?!?!?!?!?!?). We can now sit, look back and save some take-aways for the next edition of the event.

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